blastedheath:

Ged Quinn (British, b. 1963), Little House on the Borderland, 2006. Oil on linen, 183 x 276 cm.

blastedheath:

Ged Quinn (British, b. 1963), Little House on the Borderland, 2006. Oil on linen, 183 x 276 cm.

decadentiacoprofaga:

Moon People, Nicholas Roerich, 1915. Source.

decadentiacoprofaga:

Moon People, Nicholas Roerich, 1915. Source.

(via lacriniere)

monsterman:

Logan’s Run (1976)

monsterman:

Logan’s Run (1976)

(via surrogateself)

lneda:

Ivan Konstantinovitsch Aivasovsky - Rocky Seashore [1876] by Gandalf’s Gallery on Flickr.
Ivan Konstantinovitsch Aivasovsky - Rocky Seashore [1876]

lneda:

Ivan Konstantinovitsch Aivasovsky - Rocky Seashore [1876] by Gandalf’s Gallery on Flickr.

Ivan Konstantinovitsch Aivasovsky - Rocky Seashore [1876]

(via tierradentro)

dig-image:

Daido Moriyama

dig-image:

Daido Moriyama

(via memoryepsilon)

inland-delta:

Jules Guerin, University of New York, Century Magazine, 1902

inland-delta:

Jules Guerin, University of New York, Century Magazine, 1902

(via blastedheath)

(via ztbl)


Charles Guilloux, Clair de lune, 1895

Charles Guilloux, Clair de lune, 1895

(via the-night-picture-collector)

dimitrisbaboulis:

Dimitris Baboulis, Untitled, 60x62cm, india ink on paper, 2012

dimitrisbaboulis:

Dimitris Baboulis, Untitled, 60x62cm, india ink on paper, 2012

(via surrogateself)

dirtyriver:

Black Mask, July 1944

dirtyriver:

Black Mask, July 1944

withouthorilka:

Георгий Белащенко. Вий. 1897.
Viy by Georgy Belaschenko. 1897.
In East Slavic mythology, the Viy’s are creatures from the underworld, whose gaze kills. Their eyes are usually covered with large eyelids that they can not lift unassisted.
This Ukrainian depiction by Georgy Belaschenko is based on Nikolai Gogol’s short horror story "Viy".
According to Belarussian and Russian folk tales, the Viy’s eyelids could only be lifted by helpers with pitchforks. Whoever made eye contact with a Viy would die. In some versions whole towns and villages would turn into rubble upon the gaze of a Viy. It is considered that the creature is based on the folk idea of the evil eye, which can damage or kill whatever it rests its gaze upon.

withouthorilka:

Георгий Белащенко. Вий. 1897.

Viy by Georgy Belaschenko. 1897.

In East Slavic mythology, the Viy’s are creatures from the underworld, whose gaze kills. Their eyes are usually covered with large eyelids that they can not lift unassisted.

This Ukrainian depiction by Georgy Belaschenko is based on Nikolai Gogol’s short horror story "Viy".

According to Belarussian and Russian folk tales, the Viy’s eyelids could only be lifted by helpers with pitchforks. Whoever made eye contact with a Viy would die. In some versions whole towns and villages would turn into rubble upon the gaze of a Viy. It is considered that the creature is based on the folk idea of the evil eye, which can damage or kill whatever it rests its gaze upon.

(via lacriniere)